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PLoS One. 2018 Jan 23;13(1):e0191713. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0191713. eCollection 2018.

Lack of sleep is associated with internet use for leisure.

Author information

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam, Korea.
2
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Korea.
3
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea.
4
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Previous studies have suggested that excessive internet use may cause lack of sleep. However, recent studies have hypothesized that lack of sleep may instigate internet use for leisure. To elucidate the potential effects of sleep time on internet use, we explored the different associations between sleep time and internet use according to its purpose.

METHODS:

The population-based, cross-sectional study group from the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBWS) collected data from 57,425 middle school students in 2014 and 2015. Sleep time over the past 7 days was classified into the following groups: < 7 h (6 h); ≥ 7 h, < 8 h (7 h); ≥ 8 h, < 9 h (8 h); and ≥ 9 h (9+ h). Internet use time per day was separately surveyed for leisure and for study and categorized as follows: 0 h; > 0 h, ≤ 1 h (1 h); > 1 h, ≤ 2 h (2 h); and > 2 h (2+ h) per day. Information on age, sex, region of residence, body mass index (BMI), economic level, parental education level, stress level, school performance level, and sleep satisfaction were retrieved. The relationships between sleep time and internet use time for leisure/study were analyzed using multinomial logistic regression with complex sampling. In the subgroup analysis according to sleep satisfaction (good, normal, and poor), the associations of sleep time with internet use for leisure were analyzed using the same methods.

RESULTS:

Compared to 9+ h of sleep, less sleep was related to a long internet use time (2+ h) for leisure (adjusted odds ratio, AOR [95% confidence interval, CI] of sleep: 8 h = 1.23 [1.14-1.32]; 7 h = 1.42 [1.31-1.54]; and 6 h = 1.56 [1.44-1.70]; P < 0.001). Conversely, a relationship between less sleep and a long internet use time (2+ h) for study was evident only for 6 h of sleep (AOR of sleep: 8 h = 0.84 [0.84-1.04]; 7 h = 1.05 [0.94-1.17]; and 6 h = 1.32 [1.27-1.59]; P < 0.001). In the subgroup analysis according to sleep satisfaction, less sleep was associated with a long internet use time for leisure in all sleep satisfaction groups, although the relationship was more significant in the lower sleep satisfaction group.

CONCLUSION:

Less sleep was significantly related to long-term use of the internet for leisure, whereas this association was not definite for internet use for study. Furthermore, poor sleep quality potentiated the relationship between less sleep time and internet use for leisure.

PMID:
29360882
PMCID:
PMC5779686
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0191713
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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