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Neuron. 2018 Feb 7;97(3):684-697.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2017.12.043. Epub 2018 Jan 18.

Normal CA1 Place Fields but Discoordinated Network Discharge in a Fmr1-Null Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome.

Author information

1
School of Medicine, New York University, New York, NY 10016, USA.
2
Center for Neural Science, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA.
3
Department of Pathology, Robert F. Furchgott Center for Neuroscience, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA.
4
Center for Neural Science, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA; Neuroscience Institute at the New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA; Department of Physiology & Pharmacology, Robert F. Furchgott Center for Neuroscience, State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA. Electronic address: afenton@nyu.edu.

Abstract

Silence of FMR1 causes loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) and dysregulated translation at synapses, resulting in the intellectual disability and autistic symptoms of fragile X syndrome (FXS). Synaptic dysfunction hypotheses for how intellectual disabilities like cognitive inflexibility arise in FXS predict impaired neural coding in the absence of FMRP. We tested the prediction by comparing hippocampus place cells in wild-type and FXS-model mice. Experience-driven CA1 synaptic function and synaptic plasticity changes are excessive in Fmr1-null mice, but CA1 place fields are normal. However, Fmr1-null discharge relationships to local field potential oscillations are abnormally weak, stereotyped, and homogeneous; also, discharge coordination within Fmr1-null place cell networks is weaker and less reliable than wild-type. Rather than disruption of single-cell neural codes, these findings point to invariant tuning of single-cell responses and inadequate discharge coordination within neural ensembles as a pathophysiological basis of cognitive inflexibility in FXS. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

KEYWORDS:

FMRP; Fmr1; autism; fragile X syndrome; intellectual disability; learning; memory; neural coordination; place cell; synaptic plasticity

PMID:
29358017
PMCID:
PMC6066593
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2017.12.043
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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