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Sleep Breath. 2018 Dec;22(4):1037-1044. doi: 10.1007/s11325-018-1631-9. Epub 2018 Jan 22.

Intermittent nocturnal hypoxia and metabolic risk in obese adolescents with obstructive sleep apnea.

Author information

1
Department of Paediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. indra.narang@sickkids.ca.
2
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. indra.narang@sickkids.ca.
3
Department of Paediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
4
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
5
The Cardiovascular Data Management Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

There is conflicting data regarding the independent associations of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with metabolic risk in obese youth. Previous studies have not consistently addressed central adiposity, specifically elevated waist to height ratio (WHtR), which is associated with metabolic risk independent of body mass index.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to determine the independent effects of the obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (OAHI) and associated indices of nocturnal hypoxia on metabolic function in obese youth after adjusting for WHtR.

METHODS:

Subjects had standardized anthropometric measurements. Fasting blood included insulin, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, alanine transferase, and aspartate transaminase. Insulin resistance was quantified with the homeostatic model assessment. Overnight polysomnography determined the OAHI and nocturnal oxygenation indices.

RESULTS:

Of the 75 recruited subjects, 23% were diagnosed with OSA. Adjusting for age, gender, and WHtR in multivariable linear regression models, a higher oxygen desaturation index was associated with a higher fasting insulin (coefficient [standard error] = 48.076 [11.255], p < 0.001), higher glycated hemoglobin (coefficient [standard error] = 0.097 [0.041], p = 0.02), higher insulin resistance (coefficient [standard error] = 1.516 [0.364], p < 0.001), elevated alanine transferase (coefficient [standard error] = 11.631 [2.770], p < 0.001), and aspartate transaminase (coefficient [standard error] = 4.880 [1.444], p = 0.001). However, there were no significant associations between OAHI, glucose metabolism, and liver enzymes.

CONCLUSION:

Intermittent nocturnal hypoxia rather than the OAHI was associated with metabolic risk in obese youth after adjusting for WHtR. Measures of abdominal adiposity such as WHtR should be considered in future studies that evaluate the impact of OSA on metabolic health.

KEYWORDS:

Metabolic risk; Nocturnal hypoxia; Obesity; Obstructive sleep apnea

PMID:
29357088
DOI:
10.1007/s11325-018-1631-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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