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Geriatr Gerontol Int. 2018 May;18(5):799-805. doi: 10.1111/ggi.13247. Epub 2018 Jan 22.

Overweight or underweight and the risk of decline in activities of daily living in a 22-year cohort study of a Japanese sample.

Author information

1
School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Graduate School of Economics, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan.
3
The Kinugasa Research Organization, Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, Japan.
4
Faculty of Agriculture, Ryukoku University, Kyoto, Japan.
5
Department of Public Health, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Japan.
6
Faculty of Sociology, Ryukoku University, Otsu, Japan.
7
School of Medicine, Teikyo University, Tokyo, Japan.
8
Research Institute of Strategy for Prevention, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

AIM:

The present study aimed to clarify the association between body mass index (BMI) and the activities of daily living (ADL). Although BMI is likely to be concerned regarding the relationship with specific diseases or mortality, few studies have focused on the relationship of BMI and ADL.

METHODS:

A total of 3353 Japanese participants of a 22-year cohort study from 1990 to 2012 aged 45-74 years at baseline were divided into four groups according to their BMI levels: ≤18.5, 18.5-21.9 (reference), 22.0-24.9 and ≥25.0 kg/m2 . Outcomes were becoming dependent in ADL (including death after ADL decline) and death without observation of ADL decline as a competing risk. Sex-specific multinomial logistic regression analysis was carried out in 2017 to estimate the odds ratios (OR) after adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol drinking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes and serum albumin.

RESULTS:

After multivariable adjustment, though the relationship between BMI and risk of ADL decline was U-shaped among women, only those with BMI ≥25.0 showed a higher risk for ADL decline (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.01-1.92) compared with the reference. The OR for death without observation of ADL decline was significantly lower for men with BMI ≥25.0 (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.50-0.98).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study suggests being overweight is a good predictor of future decline in ADL for women, whereas men with BMI 22.0-24.9 had lower risks of ADL decline. Appropriate management of weight in older women could prevent disabilities. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 799-805.

KEYWORDS:

activities of daily living; body mass index; epidemiology; overweight; underweight

PMID:
29356340
DOI:
10.1111/ggi.13247
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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