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Laryngoscope. 2018 Apr;128(4):929-934. doi: 10.1002/lary.27061. Epub 2018 Jan 22.

Perception and duration of pain after office-based vocal fold injection augmentation.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Loma Linda University Health, Loma Linda, California, U.S.A.
2
Voice and Swallowing Center, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University Health, Loma Linda, California, U.S.A.
3
School of Medicine, Loma Linda University Health, Loma Linda, California, U.S.A.
4
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation/Pain Management, Loma Linda University Health, Loma Linda, California, U.S.A.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS:

In-office laryngology procedures are important in the treatment of voice and swallowing disorders. Patient tolerance determines which procedures can be performed without sedation or formal anesthesia. This study examines pain perception during and after in-office vocal fold injection augmentation.

STUDY DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

METHODS:

Patients scheduled for office-based vocal fold injection augmentation were prospectively enrolled at an academic voice center. The short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire was administered before, during, and after the procedure and on postprocedure days 1, 3, and 7. Pre- and postprocedure vital signs were recorded and heart rate was continuously monitored. Telephone questionnaires were completed on postprocedure days 1 and 3.

RESULTS:

Forty-five patients consented to participate in our study (24 males, mean age 61 years). Most patients experienced mild to moderate pain with increasing heart rate during the procedure. Pain remained or increased 20 minutes after the procedure and improved but persisted for 1 day. Sensory and affective discomfort was endorsed by the majority. A minority of patients experienced bruising and changes in swallowing with diet modification for 3 days after the procedure. Sixteen percent had discomfort after 1 week.

CONCLUSIONS:

This is the first prospective study examining patient perception of pain during and after in-office injection augmentation using a validated scale and pain descriptors with extended follow-up. The results may offer guidance for patient counseling, consent, and treatment to improve tolerance and success.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

4. Laryngoscope, 128:929-934, 2018.

KEYWORDS:

Laryngology; McGill Pain Questionnaire; in-office procedures; office-based procedures; pain; visual analog scale; vocal fold injection augmentation

PMID:
29355978
DOI:
10.1002/lary.27061
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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