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Forensic Sci Med Pathol. 2018 Mar;14(1):57-61. doi: 10.1007/s12024-018-9945-2. Epub 2018 Jan 22.

Point-of-care hemoglobin testing for postmortem diagnosis of anemia.

Author information

1
Biomedical Research Institute, Chonnam National University Hospital, 42, Jebong-ro, Dong-gu, Gwangju, 61469, Republic of Korea.
2
Forensic Medicine Division, National Forensic Service Gwangju Institute, 687, Chungnyeong-ro, Seosam-myeon, Jangsung, 57231, Republic of Korea.
3
Medical Examiner's Office, National Forensic Service, 10, Ipchun-ro, Wonju, 26460, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Forensic Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, 160, Baekseo-ro, Dong-gu, Gwangju, 61469, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Forensic Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, 160, Baekseo-ro, Dong-gu, Gwangju, 61469, Republic of Korea. jtpark@jnu.ac.kr.

Abstract

An autopsy involves examination of a body using invasive methods such as dissection, and includes various tests using samples procured during dissection. During medicolegal autopsies, the blood carboxyhemoglobin concentration is commonly measured using the AVOXimeter® 4000 as a point-of-care test. When evaluating the body following hypovolemic shock, characteristics such as reduced livor mortis or an anemic appearance of the viscera can be identified, but these observations arequite subjective. Thus, a more objective test is required for the postmortem diagnosis of anemia. In the present study, the AVOXimeter® 4000 was used to investigate the utility of point-of-care hemoglobin testing. Hemoglobin tests were performed in 93 autopsy cases. The AVOXimeter® 4000 and the BC-2800 Auto Hematology Analyzer were used to test identical samples in 29 of these cases. The results of hemoglobin tests performed with these two devices were statistically similar (r = 0.969). The results of hemoglobin tests using postmortem blood were compared with antemortem test results from medical records from 31 cases, and these results were similar. In 13 of 17 cases of death from internal hemorrhage, hemoglobin levels were lower in the cardiac blood than in blood from the affected body cavity, likely due to compensatory changes induced by antemortem hemorrhage. It is concluded that blood hemoglobin testing may be useful as a point-of-care test for diagnosing postmortem anemia.

KEYWORDS:

Anemia; Autopsy; Hemoglobin; Point-of-care testing

PMID:
29354888
DOI:
10.1007/s12024-018-9945-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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