Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Emerg Med. 2018 Jun;54(6):793-798. doi: 10.1016/j.jemermed.2017.12.012. Epub 2018 Jan 17.

E-Bike-Related Trauma in Children and Adults.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.
2
Department of General Surgery, Hadassah and Hebrew University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel.
3
Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University, Ein Kerem, Jerusalem, Israel.
4
Head, Trauma Unit, Hadassah and Hebrew University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel.
5
Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Electric bike (e-bike) usage is growing worldwide, and so is the e-bike-related injury rate.

OBJECTIVE:

This study was undertaken to characterize e-bike-related injuries.

METHODS:

Data of all e-bike-related injuries presenting to our level I trauma center between 2014 and 2016 were collected and analyzed. Adult and pediatric (<18 years of age) e-bike-related injuries were then analyzed separately and compared.

RESULTS:

Forty-eight patients suffering from e-bike-related injuries presented to our trauma center between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2016. Seventeen (35%) patients were <18 years of age and 40 (85%) were male. The overall most common mechanism of injury was falling off the e-bike in 24 patients (50%), followed by collision with a static object in 9 patients (18.8%). Head (38%) and facial (33%) injuries were most common in children. In adult patients, orthopedic trauma was predominant, with extremity fractures in 35 (73%) followed by significant lacerations in 14 patients (29%). Severe trauma (Injury Severity Score >15) was found in 17 (35%) patients. The duration of hospital stay was 10.8 ± 6 days, 12 patients (25%) required a stay in the intensive care unit, and 21 patients (43.7%) required surgery. Compared to adults, children (<18 years of age) had significantly more head and face injuries (p = 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Our study suggests that e-bike-related trauma may involve serious injuries and have typical injury patterns that resemble those seen in motorcycle-related injuries. Children are more likely to suffer head and face injuries because of their higher head to body ratio. We suggest that these injuries should therefore be triaged appropriately, preferably to a medical facility with proper trauma capabilities.

KEYWORDS:

e-bike; electric bike; helmets; trauma

PMID:
29352678
DOI:
10.1016/j.jemermed.2017.12.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center