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Clin Nutr. 2017 Dec 23. pii: S0261-5614(17)31435-8. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2017.12.015. [Epub ahead of print]

Resistance training during a 12-week protein supplemented VLCD treatment enhances weight-loss outcomes in obese patients.

Author information

1
Human Performance Research Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion, California State Polytechnic University Pomona, Pomona, CA, USA.
2
Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA.
3
Department of Movement Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, USA.
4
Department of Exercise Science and Health Promotion, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USA.
5
Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA; Institute of Sports Sciences and Medicine, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA; Discipline of Biokinetics, Exercise and Leisure Sciences, School of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
6
Department of Agriculture, Food, and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
7
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, Tallahassee, FL, USA.
8
Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA; Institute of Sports Sciences and Medicine, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA. Electronic address: jkim6@fsu.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This investigation evaluated the efficacy by which resistance training enhances body composition, metabolic, and functional outcomes for obese patients undergoing a 12-week medically supervised hypocaloric treatment.

METHODS:

This was a single-blind, randomized, parallel-group prospective trial. Morbidly obese patients were prescribed a 12-week proprietary very low calorie diet (VLCD) treatment (Optifast®) with supplemental protein (1120 kcals/day) and were placed in one of two groups for 14 weeks: 1) Standard Treatment Control (CON) (n = 5) or 2) Resistance Training (RT) (n = 6). Both groups underwent a pedometer-based walking program; however only RT performed resistance training 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Body composition, resting energy expenditure (REE), neuromuscular function, and serum biomarkers were measured at weeks 0, 6, and 13.

RESULTS:

Both groups exhibited a significant loss of total body mass (TBM) (CON: -19.4 ± 2.3 kg, p = 0.0009 vs. RT: -15.8 ± 1.5 kg, p = 0.0002) and fat mass (FM) (CON: -14.7 ± 1.8 kg, p = 0.0002 vs. RT: -15.1 ± 2.1 kg, p = 0.0002) with no group differences. CON lost 4.6 ± 0.8 kg (p = 0.004) of lean mass (LM) while RT demonstrated no changes. Group differences were found for the relative proportion of total weight-loss due to FM-loss (CON: 75.6 ± 3.4% vs. RT: 96.0 ± 6.0%, p = 0.03) and LM-loss (CON: 24.4 ± 3.2% vs. RT: 4.0 ± 6.5%, p = 0.03). CON demonstrated a 328.6 ± 72.7 kcal/day (-14.3 ± 2.4%) (p = 0.02) decrease in REE while RT exhibited a non-significant decrease of 4.6 ± 1.6% (p = 0.78). RT demonstrated greater improvements in all measures of contractile function and strength when compared to CON (p < 0.05). At post-treatment, RT exhibited greater serum free fatty acids (p = 0.01), glycerol (p = 0.003), and β-hydroxybutyrate (p = 0.005) than CON.

CONCLUSION:

Resistance training was advantageous for weight-loss composition by preservation of LM without compromising overall weight- or fat-loss in morbidly obese men and women undergoing a protein supplemented VLCD. These changes accompanied positive adaptations for resting metabolism and muscular function.

KEYWORDS:

Body composition; Caloric restriction; Resistance exercise; Skeletal muscle; Weight-loss

PMID:
29352654
DOI:
10.1016/j.clnu.2017.12.015

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