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J Gambl Stud. 2018 Sep;34(3):727-737. doi: 10.1007/s10899-018-9744-4.

Daily Fantasy Sports Players: Gambling, Addiction, and Mental Health Problems.

Author information

1
Center for Gambling Studies, Rutgers University School of Social Work, 390 George Street, 7th Floor, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901, USA. lnower@rutgers.edu.
2
Center for Gambling Studies, Rutgers University School of Social Work, 390 George Street, 7th Floor, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901, USA.
3
Gambling Treatment and Research Clinic, School of Psychology, University of Sydney, Camperdown, Australia.

Abstract

Studies point to a relationship between fantasy sports/daily fantasy sports (DFS) play and gambling behavior. However, little is known about the nature of those relationships, particularly regarding the development of gambling problems. This study investigates the nature, frequency, and preferences of gambling behavior as well as problem gambling severity and comorbid conditions among DFS players. Data were collected from an epidemiologic survey of 3634 New Jersey residents on gambling and leisure activities. Participants were contacted by phone (land-line and cell) and online to obtain a representative, cross-sectional sample of non-institutionalized adults, aged 18 years or older. Excluding non-gamblers, the remaining 2146 participants, included in these analyses, indicated they had either played DFS (n = 299) or had gambled but not played DFS (1847) in the past year. Univariate comparisons and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the most significant characteristics and predictors of DFS players. Overall, a higher number of gambling activities, high frequency gambling, male gender, and reports of suicidal thoughts in the past year were most predictive of DFS players. Being Hispanic (vs. Caucasian) and/or single (vs. married or living with a partner) also doubled the odds of DFS play. Findings suggest that DFS players are characterized by high gambling frequency and problem severity and comorbid problems, notably suicidal ideation. Future research should examine the motivations and possible etiological sub-types of DFS players and the nature and course of DFS play, particularly in relation to gambling behavior and the development of gambling and other problems.

KEYWORDS:

Comorbidity; Daily fantasy sports; Disordered gambling; Gambling; Problem gambling; Subtypes

PMID:
29352358
DOI:
10.1007/s10899-018-9744-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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