Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2018 Oct;66(7):583-588. doi: 10.1055/s-0037-1620273. Epub 2018 Jan 19.

Risk of Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax According to Chest Configuration.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology and the Research Institute of Radiological Science, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, Republic of Korea.
5
Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
6
Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
7
Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We compared the chest configurations of patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) and age-sex-matched controls to determine the presence of chest wall deformities in patients with PSP.

METHODS:

We retrospectively enrolled 166 male patients with PSP (age, 18-19 years) and 85 age-sex-matched controls without PSP, who simultaneously underwent chest computed tomography (CT) and radiography at one of two institutes. After correcting for height, the following thoracic parameters were comparatively evaluated between the two groups: maximal internal transverse (T) and anteroposterior (W) diameters of the chest, maximal internal lung height (H), Haller index (T/W), and T/Height, T/H, W/Height, W/H, and H/Height ratios.

RESULTS:

Patients were taller than the control subjects (176.5 cm ± 5.9 cm versus 174.4 cm ± 5.6 cm; p = 0.007). After controlling for height, the patient group exhibited lower T and W and greater H and Haller index values than the control group (T: 95% confidence interval [CI], 24.8-25.2 cm versus 25.9-26.5; W: 95% CI, 8.9-9.2 cm versus 10.1-10.6 cm; H: 95% CI, 25.2-25.9 cm versus 23.4-24.4 cm; and Haller index, 95% CI, 2.7-2.9 versus 2.4-2.6; all, p < 0.001). The patient group also exhibited lower T/Height, T/H, W/Height, and W/H ratios and greater H/Height ratio than the control group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with PSP have an anteroposteriorly flatter, laterally narrower, and craniocaudally taller thorax than subjects without PSP, suggesting that chest configuration is associated with the development of pneumothorax.

PMID:
29351696
DOI:
10.1055/s-0037-1620273
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart, New York
Loading ...
Support Center