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Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2018 Mar;14(3):140-162. doi: 10.1038/nrendo.2017.161. Epub 2018 Jan 19.

Animal models of obesity and diabetes mellitus.

Author information

1
Institute for Diabetes and Obesity, Helmholtz Diabetes Center at Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.
2
Division of Metabolic Diseases, Department of Medicine, Technische Universität München, D-80333 Munich, Germany.
3
German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.
4
Section of Molecular Physiology, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
5
Institute for Diabetes and Regeneration Research, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.
6
Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik IV, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Ziemssenstr. 1, D-80336 Munich, Germany.
7
Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 37212, USA.
8
Chair for Molecular Animal Breeding and Biotechnology, Gene Center, Ludwig-Maximilan University München, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 25, D-81377 Munich, Germany.
9
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, Metabolic Diseases Institute, 2170 East Galbraith Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45237, USA.
10
Institute of Experimental Genetics, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.
11
Technische Universität München, Chair of Experimental Genetics, D-85354 Freising, Germany.
12
Department of Experimental Diabetology, German Institute of Human Nutrition (DIfE), Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, D-14558 Nuthetal, Germany.
13
Institute of Stem Cell Research, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.
14
Chair of Molecular Nutritional Medicine, Technische Universität München, TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan, Gregor-Mendel-Str. 2, D-85354 Freising, Germany.
15
Else Kröner-Fresenius Center for Nutritional Medicine, Technische Universität München, D-85354 Freising, Germany.
16
Institute for Food & Health, Technische Universität München, D-85354 Freising, Germany.
17
MicroBiome Therapeutics, 1316 Jefferson Ave, New Orleans, Louisiana 70115, USA.
18
Energy Metabolism Laboratory, Institute of Translational Medicine, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich, CH-8603 Zurich-Schwerzenbach, Switzerland.
19
Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine and Department of Nutrition, 3135 Meyer Hall, University of California, Davis, California 95616-5270, USA.

Abstract

More than one-third of the worldwide population is overweight or obese and therefore at risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus. In order to mitigate this pandemic, safer and more potent therapeutics are urgently required. This necessitates the continued use of animal models to discover, validate and optimize novel therapeutics for their safe use in humans. In order to improve the transition from bench to bedside, researchers must not only carefully select the appropriate model but also draw the right conclusions. In this Review, we consolidate the key information on the currently available animal models of obesity and diabetes and highlight the advantages, limitations and important caveats of each of these models.

PMID:
29348476
DOI:
10.1038/nrendo.2017.161

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