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Sci Rep. 2018 Jan 18;8(1):1149. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-17397-9.

Gender specific association of parathyroid hormone and vitamin D with metabolic syndrome in population with preserved renal function.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea. leejm68@catholic.ac.kr.

Abstract

The association of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and vitamin D with Metabolic syndrome (MetS) was evaluated using representative data from the Korean population. Data from 7004 subjects aged 50 or older with preserved renal function (excluding chronic kidney disease stage 3b to 5) who were included in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2008 and 2010 were analysed. Higher PTH levels (pg/ml) were observed in subjects with MetS than in those without MetS among both genders (60.1 (58.6-61.6) vs. 62.4 (60.7-64.2) in males p = 0.018, 60.7 (59.4-62.1) vs. 63.9 (62.4-65.6) in females, p < 0.001). For females, PTH levels were significantly higher in subjects with MetS than in those without MetS after adjustment for possible covariates. Lower 25(OH)D levels were significantly associated with MetS only in male subjects (p = 0.004). As the number of MetS components increased, a significant rise in PTH levels (p for trend 0.005 in males and 0.024 in females) and a decrease in 25(OH)D levels (p for trend < 0.001 in males and 0.053 in females) were observed. In conclusion, among subjects with preserved renal function, PTH levels were possibly associated with MetS in females, whereas vitamin D levels exhibited a possible link to MetS in males.

PMID:
29348466
PMCID:
PMC5773688
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-17397-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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