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AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2018 Aug;39(8):1390-1399. doi: 10.3174/ajnr.A5527. Epub 2018 Jan 18.

Resting-State Functional MRI: Everything That Nonexperts Have Always Wanted to Know.

Author information

1
From the Department of Radiology (H.L., Z.W.), Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
2
Department of Radiology (H.L., G.Z., M.Z., M.W.), Neuroradiology Division.
3
Department of Radiology (E.T.), Neuroradiology Section, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
4
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (L.M.W., A.N.G.-P., T.M.B.), Stanford University, Stanford, California.
5
Department of Radiology (C.L.), Yunnan Tumor Hospital (The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University), Kunming, Yunnan Province, China.
6
Department of Radiology (H.L., G.Z., M.Z., M.W.), Neuroradiology Division Max.Wintermark@gmail.com.

Abstract

Resting-state fMRI was first described by Biswal et al in 1995 and has since then been widely used in both healthy subjects and patients with various neurologic, neurosurgical, and psychiatric disorders. As opposed to paradigm- or task-based functional MR imaging, resting-state fMRI does not require subjects to perform any specific task. The low-frequency oscillations of the resting-state fMRI signal have been shown to relate to the spontaneous neural activity. There are many ways to analyze resting-state fMRI data. In this review article, we will briefly describe a few of these and highlight the advantages and limitations of each. This description is to facilitate the adoption and use of resting-state fMRI in the clinical setting, helping neuroradiologists become familiar with these techniques and applying them for the care of patients with neurologic and psychiatric diseases.

PMID:
29348136
PMCID:
PMC6051935
DOI:
10.3174/ajnr.A5527
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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