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Cell Rep. 2018 Jan 16;22(3):600-610. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2017.12.072.

Single-Cell Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Cellular Diversity and Intercommunication in the Mouse Heart.

Author information

1
The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA.
2
The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA; Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA.
3
The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, Farmington, CT, USA.
4
The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA; The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, Farmington, CT, USA; Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT, USA.
5
The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA; Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA; The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, Farmington, CT, USA; Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: nadia.rosenthal@jax.org.
6
The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA; Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: alex.pinto@jax.org.

Abstract

Characterization of the cardiac cellulome, the network of cells that form the heart, is essential for understanding cardiac development and normal organ function and for formulating precise therapeutic strategies to combat heart disease. Recent studies have reshaped our understanding of cardiac cellular composition and highlighted important functional roles for non-myocyte cell types. In this study, we characterized single-cell transcriptional profiles of the murine non-myocyte cardiac cellular landscape using single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq). Detailed molecular analyses revealed the diversity of the cardiac cellulome and facilitated the development of techniques to isolate understudied cardiac cell populations, such as mural cells and glia. Our analyses also revealed extensive networks of intercellular communication and suggested prevalent sexual dimorphism in gene expression in the heart. This study offers insights into the structure and function of the mammalian cardiac cellulome and provides an important resource that will stimulate studies in cardiac cell biology.

KEYWORDS:

10X; cardiac non-myocyte; cell type markers; cell-cell communication; cellulome; heart; mouse; sexual dimorphism; single cell RNA-seq

PMID:
29346760
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2017.12.072
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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