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MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018 Jan 19;67(2):71-76. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6702a4.

Respiratory Syncytial Virus Seasonality - United States, 2014-2017.

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in young children worldwide (1-3). In the United States, RSV infection results in >57,000 hospitalizations and 2 million outpatient visits each year among children aged <5 years (3). Recent studies have highlighted the importance of RSV in adults as well as children (4). CDC reported RSV seasonality nationally, by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) regions* and for the state of Florida, using a new statistical method that analyzes polymerase chain reaction (PCR) laboratory detections reported to the National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) (https://www.cdc.gov/surveillance/nrevss/index.html). Nationally, across three RSV seasons, lasting from the week ending July 5, 2014 through July 1, 2017, the median RSV onset occurred at week 41 (mid-October), and lasted 31 weeks until week 18 (early May). The median national peak occurred at week 5 (early February). Using these new methods, RSV season circulation patterns differed from those reported from previous seasons (5). Health care providers and public health officials use RSV circulation data to guide diagnostic testing and to time the administration of RSV immunoprophylaxis for populations at high risk for severe respiratory illness (6). With several vaccines and other immunoprophlyaxis products in development, estimates of RSV circulation are also important to the design of clinical trials and future vaccine effectiveness studies.

PMID:
29346336
PMCID:
PMC5772804
DOI:
10.15585/mmwr.mm6702a4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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