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J Clin Virol. 2018 Feb - Mar;99-100:67-70. doi: 10.1016/j.jcv.2018.01.003. Epub 2018 Jan 11.

Performance of the BioPlex 2200 HIV Ag-Ab assay for identifying acute HIV infection.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States. Electronic address: seshlem@jhmi.edu.
2
Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States. Electronic address: epiwowa@jhmi.edu.
3
Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States. Electronic address: msivay1@jhmi.edu.
4
Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States. Electronic address: Bdebeve1@jhmi.edu.
5
Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States. Electronic address: sveater1@jhmi.edu.
6
Statistical Center for AIDS Research and Prevention, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, United States. Electronic address: lamckins@scharp.org.
7
The Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, University of Cape Town, South Africa. Electronic address: linda-gail.bekker@hiv-research.org.za.
8
Department of Medicine, Harlem Hospital, Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY, United States. Electronic address: Sbm20@cumc.columbia.edu.
9
University of California, San Francisco Gladstone Institutes, San Francisco, CA, United States. Electronic address: rgrant@gladstone.ucsf.edu.
10
Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Univers ity of California, San Francisco, CA, United States. Electronic address: Margaret.Chesney@ucsf.edu.
11
Center for World Health, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, United States. Electronic address: tcoates@mednet.ucla.edu.
12
Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention, New York Blood Center, New York, NY, United States. Electronic address: bkoblin@nybc.org.
13
Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States. Electronic address: jfogel@jhmi.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Assays that detect HIV antigen (Ag) and antibody (Ab) can be used to screen for HIV infection.

OBJECTIVES:

To compare the performance of the BioPlex 2200 HIV Ag-Ab assay and two other Ag/Ab combination assays for detection of acute HIV infection.

STUDY DESIGN:

Samples were obtained from 24 individuals (18 from the US, 6 from South Africa); these individuals were classified as having acute infection based on the following criteria: positive qualitative RNA assay; two negative rapid tests; negative discriminatory test. The samples were tested with the BioPlex assay, the ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo test, the Bio-Rad GS HIV Combo Ag-Ab EIA test, and a viral load assay.

RESULTS:

Twelve (50.0%) of 24 samples had RNA detected only ( > 40 to 13,476 copies/mL). Ten (43.5%) samples had reactive results with all three Ag/Ab assays, one sample was reactive with the ARCHITECT and Bio-Rad assays, and one sample was reactive with the Bio-Rad and BioPlex assays. The 11 samples that were reactive with the BioPlex assay had viral loads from 83,010 to >750,000 copies/mL; 9/11 samples were classified as Ag positive/Ab negative by the BioPlex assay.

CONCLUSIONS:

Detection of acute HIV infection was similar for the BioPlex assay and two other Ag/Ab assays. All three tests were less sensitive than a qualitative RNA assay and only detected HIV Ag when the viral load was high. The BioPlex assay detected acute infection in about half of the cases, and identified most of those infections as Ag positive/Ab negative.

KEYWORDS:

Acute; Ag/Ab assay; BioPlex; HIV

PMID:
29346085
PMCID:
PMC5807223
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcv.2018.01.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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