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Nanomedicine (Lond). 2018 Feb;13(4):423-438. doi: 10.2217/nnm-2017-0300. Epub 2018 Jan 18.

Magnetoelectric nanoparticles for delivery of antitumor peptides into glioblastoma cells by magnetic fields.

Author information

1
Center for Personalized Nanomedicine, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA.
2
Center for Nano Science & Technology, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, USA.
3
Cellular Nanomed, Coral Springs, FL, USA.
4
Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA.
5
Brain Center, Miami, FL, USA.

Abstract

AIM:

We studied externally controlled anticancer effects of binding tumor growth inhibiting synthetic peptides to magnetoelectric nanoparticles (MENs) on treatment of glioblastomas.

METHODS:

Hydrothermally synthesized 30-nm MENs had the core-shell composition of CoFe2O4@BaTiO3. Molecules of growth hormone-releasing hormone antagonist of the MIA class (MIA690) were chemically bound to MENs. In vitro experiments utilized human glioblastoma cells (U-87MG) and human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

RESULTS:

The studies demonstrated externally controlled high-efficacy binding of MIA690 to MENs, targeted specificity to glioblastoma cells and on-demand release of the peptide by application of d.c. and a.c. magnetic fields, respectively.

CONCLUSION:

The results support the use of MENs as an effective drug delivery carrier for growth hormone-releasing hormone antagonists in the treatment of human glioblastomas.

KEYWORDS:

cancer/oncology; gene/drug delivery; nanoparticles

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