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PLoS One. 2018 Jan 17;13(1):e0190535. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0190535. eCollection 2018.

Health behavior associated with liver enzymes among obese Korean adolescents, 2009-2014.

Author information

1
Department of Cancer Control and Population Health, Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang, Republic of Korea.
2
Center for Liver Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

AIMS:

Obesity is major risk factor for liver health. This study aimed to clarify whether specific health behaviors were associated with liver function in obese adolescents in Korea.

METHODS:

Based on national school health examination data from 2009 to 2014, 25,142 obese or overweight students were examined for aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase levels, and health behaviors. Multiple logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio for liver enzyme elevation.

RESULTS:

Subjects who thought of themselves as "very fat" had a 1.6 times higher odds ratio for liver enzyme elevations than those who thought of themselves as "normal." Those who consumed fast food 3 to 5 times weekly had 1.3 times higher odds ratio (OR = 1.27, 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.54) for the elevation of ALT than those who did not consume fast food. Those who took sugar-sweetened beverage 3 to 5 times weekly had 1.2 times higher odds ratio (OR = 1.24, 95% confidence interval = 1.07-1.42) for the elevation of ALT than those who did not take it. Those who played computer game more than 2 hours a day showed 1.1 times higher odds ratio (OR = 1.10, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-1.21) for the elevation of ALT than those who did not.

CONCLUSIONS:

Specific food item and its frequency of consumption were identified for the positive and negative association with the elevation of liver enzymes. Self-image of body shape, sleeping time and need of help for alcohol or smoking problems also showed substantial association with the elevation.

PMID:
29342171
PMCID:
PMC5771561
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0190535
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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