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J Pediatr. 2018 Apr;195:279-282.e3. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.11.056. Epub 2018 Jan 11.

Hand Preference and Cognitive, Motor, and Behavioral Functioning in 10-Year-Old Extremely Preterm Children.

Author information

1
Victorian Infant Brain Studies, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia; Premature Infant Follow-Up Program, Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; Neonatal Medicine, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; Department of Pediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address: alice.burnett@mcri.edu.au.
2
Victorian Infant Brain Studies, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia; Premature Infant Follow-Up Program, Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
3
Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University, Boston, MA.
4
Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA; Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
5
Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.
6
Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA.
7
Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA.
8
Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA.
9
Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA.
10
Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA.
11
University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA.
12
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.
13
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC.
14
University Health Systems of Eastern Carolina, Greenville, NC.
15
North Carolina Children's Hospital, Chapel Hill, NC.
16
Helen DeVos Children's Hospital, Grand Rapids, MI.
17
Sparrow Hospital, Lansing, MI.
18
University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL.
19
William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI.

Abstract

The association of hand preference (left, mixed, and right) with cognitive, academic, motor, and behavioral function was evaluated in 864 extremely preterm children at 10 years of age. Left-handed and right-handed children performed similarly but mixed-handed children had greater odds of functional deficits across domains than right-handed children.

PMID:
29336793
PMCID:
PMC5869125
[Available on 2019-04-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.11.056

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