Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Bone Marrow Transplant. 2018 May;53(5):617-624. doi: 10.1038/s41409-017-0067-3. Epub 2018 Jan 15.

Long-term outcome analysis of reduced-intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with mantle cell lymphoma: a retrospective study from the EBMT Lymphoma Working Party.

Author information

1
University Hospitals Bristol, Bristol, UK. stephen.robinson@ubht.nhs.uk.
2
Lymphoma Working Party EBMT, Paris, France.
3
University College London Hospital, London, UK.
4
CHU, Nantes, France.
5
Hospital Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain.
6
University of Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.
7
Cliniques Universitaires St. Luc, Brussels, Belgium.
8
Hôpital La Miletrie, Poitiers, France.
9
CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.
10
Hôpital Huriez, Lille, France.
11
St. George's Hospital, London, UK.
12
University Hospital Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
13
Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Ramat Gan, Israel.
14
Medical Park Hospitals, Antalya, Turkey.
15
University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
16
St. Bartholomew's Hospital, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK.

Abstract

Reduced-intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation (RIST) is usually reserved for patients with mantle cell lymphoma who relapse after an autoSCT. However, the long-term efficacy of RIST and its curative potential have not been clearly demonstrated. We studied the long-term outcome of patients receiving a RIST for MCL as reported to the EBMT. A total of 324 patients, median age 57 years (range 31-70), underwent a RIST between 2000 and 2008; 43% of the patients had received >3 lines of prior therapy, including an autoSCT in 46%. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) was 10% at 100 days and 24% at 1 year and was lower for patients receiving anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG)/ALG (RR 0.59, p = 0.046). After a median follow-up of 72 months (range 3-159), 118 patients relapsed at a median of 8 months post RIST (range 1-117). The cumulative incidence of relapse was 25% and 40% at 1 and 5 years, respectively, and was associated with chemorefractory disease (HR 0.49, p = 0.01) and the use of CAMPATH (HR 2.59, p = 0.0002). The 4-year progression-free survival rate and overall survival rate was 31 and 40%, respectively. RIST results in long-term disease-free survival in about 30% of the patients, including those patients relapsing after a prior autoSCT.

PMID:
29335632
DOI:
10.1038/s41409-017-0067-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center