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Biomed Environ Sci. 2017 Dec;30(12):922-926. doi: 10.3967/bes2017.124.

Tea Consumption is Associated with Increased Risk of Kidney Stones in Northern Chinese: A Cross-sectional Study.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, The Affiliated Wenling Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenling 317500, Zhejiang, China.
2
Research Center for Translational Medicine, The Affiliated Wenling Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenling 317500, Zhejiang, China.
3
Beijing Key Laboratory of Clinical Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069, China.
4
Beijing Institute of Heart, Lung and Blood Vessel Diseases, Bejing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100029, China.
5
Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Wenling Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenling 317500, Zhejiang, China.

Abstract

Kidney stones are a common urinary system condition that can progress to kidney disease. Previous studies on the association between tea consumption and kidney stones are inconsistent. A cross-sectional study to investigate the association between tea consumption and kidney stones was conducted from 2013 to 2014 and recruited 9,078 northern Chinese adults. A total of 8,807 participants were included in the final analysis. Participants' prevalence of kidney stones was 1.07%, 1.73%, and 2.25% based on their tea consumption frequency of never, occasionally, and often groups, respectively. Compared with the 'never' group, the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the occurrence of kidney stones were 1.57 (1.00-2.46) and 1.65 (1.06-2.57) in the 'occasionally' and 'often' groups, respectively. After adjusting for sex, age, and other potential confounding factors, tea consumption still significantly increased the risk of kidney stones. Tea consumption is independently associated with an increased risk of kidney stones in the investigated population, suggesting that a decrease in the consumption of tea may be a preventive strategy for kidney stones.

PMID:
29335063
DOI:
10.3967/bes2017.124
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