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Antioxid Redox Signal. 2019 Feb 20;30(6):906-923. doi: 10.1089/ars.2017.7478. Epub 2018 Feb 22.

Regulation of Cancer and Cancer-Related Genes via NAD.

Author information

1
1 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.
2
2 Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.
3
3 Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.
4
4 Centre for Innovative and Collaborative Health Systems Research, IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Canada.

Abstract

SIGNIFICANCE:

NAD+ is an essential redox cofactor in cellular metabolism and has emerged as an important regulator of a wide spectrum of disease conditions, most notably, cancers. As such, various strategies targeting NAD+ synthesis in cancers are in clinical trials. Recent Advances: Being a substrate required for the activity of various enzyme families, especially sirtuins and poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerases, NAD+-mediated signaling plays an important role in gene expression, calcium release, cell cycle progression, DNA repair, and cell proliferation. Many strategies exploring the potential of interfering with NAD+ metabolism to sensitize cancer cells to achieve anticancer benefits are highly promising, and are being pursued.

CRITICAL ISSUES:

With the multifaceted roles of NAD+ in cancer, it is important to understand how cellular processes are reliant on NAD+. This review summarizes how NAD+ metabolism regulates various pathophysiological processes in cancer, and how this knowledge can be exploited to devise effective anticancer therapies in clinical settings.

FUTURE DIRECTIONS:

In line with the redundant pathways that facilitate NAD+ metabolism, further studies should comprehensively understand the roles of the various NAD+-synthesizing as well as NAD+-utilizing biomolecules to understand its true potential in cancer treatment.

KEYWORDS:

NAD; cancer; metabolism; redox signaling; sirtuins

PMID:
29334761
DOI:
10.1089/ars.2017.7478

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