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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Feb;78(2):237-247. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2017.08.059.

Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma: Incidence, risk factors, diagnosis, and staging.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: keenaq@gmail.com.
2
Medstar Georgetown Melanoma and Skin Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC.
3
Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), a malignant proliferation of cutaneous epithelium, represents 20% to 50% of skin cancers. Although the majority of cSCCs are successfully eradicated by surgical excision, a subset of cSCC possesses features associated with a higher likelihood of recurrence, metastasis, and death. The proper identification of these aggressive cSCCs can guide additional work-up and management. In the first article in this continuing medical education series, we discuss the incidence, recurrence rates, mortality rates, and risk factors associated with cSCC and review the staging systems used to stratify patients into high- and low-risk groups. The second article in this series reviews the treatment options for cSCC, with focused attention on the management of high-stage tumors.

KEYWORDS:

5-fluorouracil, imiquimod, ingenol mebutate; American Joint Commission on Cancer; Brigham and Women's Hospital staging system; CDKN2A; CT; MRI; N1S3 staging; NOTCH1; PD-1; Ras; acitretin; cSCC; capecitabine; cetuximab; chemotherapy; classification; cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma; familial cancer syndromes; high-risk; management; nicotinamide; nivolumab; p53; pembrolizumab; photodynamic therapy; radiation therapy; retinoids; risk factors; sentinel lymph node biopsy; sirolimus; staging

PMID:
29332704
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2017.08.059
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