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J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2018 Feb;41(2):92-101. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.08.007. Epub 2018 Jan 10.

Association Between Symptoms of Central Sensitization and Cognitive Behavioral Factors in People With Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain: A Cross-sectional Study.

Author information

1
Department of Physiotherapy, Human Physiology and Anatomy, Faculty of Physical Education & Physiotherapy (KIMA), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium; Department of Public Health (GEWE), Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: Eva.huysmans@vub.be.
2
Department of Physiotherapy, Human Physiology and Anatomy, Faculty of Physical Education & Physiotherapy (KIMA), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium; Department of Physical Medicine and Physiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
3
Private Physiotherapy Practice, Tom Cools, Schelle, Belgium.
4
Center for Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine & Pharmacy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium; Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacokinetics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
5
Faculty of Medicine, Universiteit Antwerpen, Wilrijk, Belgium.
6
Department of Physiotherapy, Human Physiology and Anatomy, Faculty of Physical Education & Physiotherapy (KIMA), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
7
Center for Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine & Pharmacy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium; Department of Neurosurgery, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.; Department of Manual Therapy (MANU), Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
8
Department of Neurosurgery, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.; Department of Manual Therapy (MANU), Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this cross-sectional study was to analyze the relationship between symptoms of central sensitization (CS) and important cognitive behavioral and psychosocial factors in a sample of patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain.

METHODS:

Participants with chronic nonspecific low back pain for at least 3 months were included in the study. They completed several questionnaires and a functional test. Pearson's correlation was used to analyze associations between symptoms of CS and pain behavior, functioning, pain, pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, and illness perceptions. Additionally, a between-group analysis was performed to compare patients with and without clinically relevant symptoms of CS.

RESULTS:

Data from 38 participants were analyzed. Significant associations were found between symptoms of CS and all other outcomes, especially current pain (r = 0.510, P = .001), mean pain during the past 7 days (r = 0.505, P = .001), and pain catastrophizing (r = 0.518, P = .001). Patients with clinically relevant symptoms of CS scored significantly worse on all outcomes compared with persons without relevant symptoms of CS, except on functioning (P = .128).

CONCLUSIONS:

Symptoms of CS were significantly associated with psychosocial and cognitive behavioral factors. Patients exhibiting a clinically relevant degree of symptoms of CS scored significantly worse on most outcomes, compared with the subgroup of the sample with fewer symptoms of CS.

KEYWORDS:

Catastrophizing; Central Nervous System Sensitization; Illness Behavior; Low Back Pain

PMID:
29329739
DOI:
10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.08.007

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