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Cell Immunol. 2018 Mar;325:1-13. doi: 10.1016/j.cellimm.2018.01.002. Epub 2018 Jan 3.

Transcriptomic evidence of immune activation in macroscopically normal-appearing and scarred lung tissues in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

Author information

1
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; Veterans Administration Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USA.
2
Otogenetics Corporation, Atlanta, GA, USA.
3
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
4
Pulmonary and Mediastinal Pathology, Department of Defense, Joint Pathology Center, Silver Spring, MD, USA.
5
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; Veterans Administration Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: satamas@som.umaryland.edu.

Abstract

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal lung disease manifested by overtly scarred peripheral and basilar regions and more normal-appearing central lung areas. Lung tissues from macroscopically normal-appearing (IPFn) and scarred (IPFs) areas of explanted IPF lungs were analyzed by RNASeq and compared with healthy control (HC) lung tissues. There were profound transcriptomic changes in IPFn compared with HC tissues, which included elevated expression of numerous immune-, inflammation-, and extracellular matrix-related mRNAs, and these changes were similar to those observed with IPFs compared to HC. Comparing IPFn directly to IPFs, elevated expression of epithelial mucociliary mRNAs was observed in the IPFs tissues. Thus, despite the known geographic tissue heterogeneity in IPF, the entire lung is actively involved in the disease process, and demonstrates pronounced elevated expression of numerous immune-related genes. Differences between normal-appearing and scarred tissues may thus be driven by deranged epithelial homeostasis or possibly non-transcriptomic factors.

KEYWORDS:

Fibrosis; Inflammation; Lung; Transcriptome

PMID:
29329637
PMCID:
PMC5826809
DOI:
10.1016/j.cellimm.2018.01.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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