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Mol Med Rep. 2018 Mar;17(3):4399-4405. doi: 10.3892/mmr.2018.8401. Epub 2018 Jan 9.

Vanillin improves scopolamine‑induced memory impairment through restoration of ID1 expression in the mouse hippocampus.

Author information

1
Department of Neurobiology, School of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Gangwon 24341, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Biomedical Science, Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwon 24252, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwon 24252, Republic of Korea.
4
Institute of Integrative Traditional and Western Medicine, Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, Jiangsu 225001, P.R. China.
5
Division of Food Biotechnology, School of Biotechnology, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Gangwon 24341, Republic of Korea.
6
Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Gangwon 24289, Republic of Korea.
7
Department of Emergency Medicine, Seoul Hospital, College of Medicine, Sooncheonhyang University, Seoul 04401, Republic of Korea.
8
Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwon 24252, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

4-Hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde (vanillin), contained in a number of species of plant, has been reported to display beneficial effects against brain injuries. In the present study, the impact of vanillin on scopolamine‑induced alterations in cognition and the expression of DNA binding protein inhibitor ID‑1 (ID1), one of the inhibitors of DNA binding/differentiation proteins that regulate gene transcription, in the mouse hippocampus. Mice were treated with 1 mg/kg scopolamine with or without 40 mg/kg vanillin once daily for 4 weeks. Scopolamine‑induced cognitive impairment was observed from 1 week and was deemed to be severe 4 weeks following the administration of scopolamine. However, treatment with vanillin in scopolamine‑treated mice markedly attenuated cognitive impairment 4 weeks following treatment with scopolamine. ID1‑immunoreactive cells were revealed in the hippocampus of vehicle‑treated mice, and were hardly detected 4 weeks following treatment with scopolamine. However, treatment with vanillin in scopolamine‑treated mice markedly restored ID1‑immunoreactive cells and expression 4 weeks subsequent to treatment. The results of the present study suggested that vanillin may be beneficial for cognitive impairment, by preventing the reduction of ID1 expression which may be associated with cognitive impairment.

PMID:
29328430
PMCID:
PMC5802214
DOI:
10.3892/mmr.2018.8401
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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