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Mult Scler. 2019 Mar;25(3):352-360. doi: 10.1177/1352458517751647. Epub 2018 Jan 12.

Impact of 3 Tesla MRI on interobserver agreement in clinically isolated syndrome: A MAGNIMS multicentre study.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, MS Center Amsterdam, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, MS Center Amsterdam, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands/Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Onze Lieve Vrouwen Gasthuis, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy/Department of Neurosciences, San Camillo-Forlanini Hospital, Rome, Italy.
4
Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy/NMR Research Unit, Queen Square Multiple Sclerosis Centre, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
5
NMR Research Unit, Queen Square Multiple Sclerosis Centre, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK; Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Neurosciences and Sense Organs, University of Bari, Bari, Italy.
6
NMR Research Unit, Queen Square Multiple Sclerosis Centre, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
7
Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
8
Department of Neurology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
9
Department of Neurology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland/Medical Image Analysis Center (MIAC), Basel, Switzerland/Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
10
Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
11
Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy/Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo, Neuromed, Pozzilli, Italy.
12
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
13
Department of Neurology, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain.
14
Medical Image Analysis Center (MIAC), Basel, Switzerland/NeuroCure, Charité - Berlin University of Medicine, Berlin, Germany/Department of Biomedical Engineering, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
15
Department of Neurosciences, San Camillo-Forlanini Hospital, Rome, Italy.
16
Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Josef Hospital, Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany.
17
Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain.
18
Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, MS Center Amsterdam, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands/Institutes of Neurology and Healthcare Engineering, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK.
19
Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, MS Center Amsterdam, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Compared to 1.5 T, 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) increases signal-to-noise ratio leading to improved image quality. However, its clinical relevance in clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of multiple sclerosis remains uncertain.

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this study was to investigate how 3 T MRI affects the agreement between raters on lesion detection and diagnosis.

METHODS:

We selected 30 patients and 10 healthy controls from our ongoing prospective multicentre cohort. All subjects received baseline 1.5 and 3 T brain and spinal cord MRI. Patients also received follow-up brain MRI at 3-6 months. Four experienced neuroradiologists and four less-experienced raters scored the number of lesions per anatomical region and determined dissemination in space and time (McDonald 2010).

RESULTS:

In controls, the mean number of lesions per rater was 0.16 at 1.5 T and 0.38 at 3 T ( p = 0.005). For patients, this was 4.18 and 4.40, respectively ( p = 0.657). Inter-rater agreement on involvement per anatomical region and dissemination in space and time was moderate to good for both field strengths. 3 T slightly improved agreement between experienced raters, but slightly decreased agreement between less-experienced raters.

CONCLUSION:

Overall, the interobserver agreement was moderate to good. 3 T appears to improve the reading for experienced readers, underlining the benefit of additional training.

KEYWORDS:

Multiple sclerosis; clinically isolated syndrome; interobserver variation; magnetic resonance imaging; multicentre study

PMID:
29327668
PMCID:
PMC6393953
DOI:
10.1177/1352458517751647
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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