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J Public Health (Oxf). 2018 Sep 1;40(3):e351-e358. doi: 10.1093/pubmed/fdx178.

Limited salt consumption reduces the incidence of chronic kidney disease: a modeling study.

Author information

1
Center for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
2
Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, RB Groningen, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, University Medical Center, GA Utrecht, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Transplantation, Erasmus Medical Center, CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
5
Division of Human Nutrition, Department of Agrotechnology and Food Sciences, Wageningen University, HB Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Background:

In addition to blood pressure and cardiovascular disease, high-salt intake has been associated with renal diseases. The aim of this study is to estimate the potential health impact of salt reduction on chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in the Netherlands.

Methods:

We developed a dynamic population health modeling tool to estimate the health impact of salt reduction on CKD and ESKD. We used data from the PREVEND study and extrapolated that to the Dutch population aged 30-75 years. We estimated the potential health impact of salt reduction comparing the current situation with the health impact of the adherence to the recommended maximum salt intake of 6 g/d.

Results:

In the recommended maximum intake scenario, a cumulative reduction in CKD of 1.1% (N = 290 000; interquartile range (IQR) = 249 000) and in ESKD of 3.2% (N = 470; IQR = 5080) would occur over a period of 20 years.

Conclusions:

Our health impact estimation showed that health benefits on CKD might be achieved when salt intake is reduced to the recommended maximum intake of 6 g/d.

PMID:
29325124
DOI:
10.1093/pubmed/fdx178
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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