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PLoS One. 2018 Jan 11;13(1):e0190632. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0190632. eCollection 2018.

Obesogenic diets alter metabolism in mice.

Author information

1
NIH West Coast Metabolomics Center, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, United States of America.
2
Department of Nutrition, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, United States of America.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, United States of America.
4
Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

Obesity and accompanying metabolic disease is negatively correlated with lung health yet the exact mechanisms by which obesity affects the lung are not well characterized. Since obesity is associated with lung diseases as chronic bronchitis and asthma, we designed a series of experiments to measure changes in lung metabolism in mice fed obesogenic diets. Mice were fed either control or high fat/sugar diet (45%kcal fat/17%kcal sucrose), or very high fat diet (60%kcal fat/7% sucrose) for 150 days. We performed untargeted metabolomics by GC-TOFMS and HILIC-QTOFMS and lipidomics by RPLC-QTOFMS to reveal global changes in lung metabolism resulting from obesity and diet composition. From a total of 447 detected metabolites, we found 91 metabolite and lipid species significantly altered in mouse lung tissues upon dietary treatments. Significantly altered metabolites included complex lipids, free fatty acids, energy metabolites, amino acids and adenosine and NAD pathway members. While some metabolites were altered in both obese groups compared to control, others were different between obesogenic diet groups. Furthermore, a comparison of changes between lung, kidney and liver tissues indicated few metabolic changes were shared across organs, suggesting the lung is an independent metabolic organ. These results indicate obesity and diet composition have direct mechanistic effects on composition of the lung metabolome, which may contribute to disease progression by lung-specific pathways.

PMID:
29324762
PMCID:
PMC5764261
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0190632
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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