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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018 Oct;72(10):1413-1420. doi: 10.1038/s41430-017-0053-2. Epub 2018 Jan 10.

Effect of monitoring salt concentration of home-prepared dishes and using low-sodium seasonings on sodium intake reduction.

Author information

1
Division of Nutrition Science, Graduate School of Sagami Women's University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Minami-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-0383, Japan.
2
Division of Nutrition Science, Graduate School of Sagami Women's University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Minami-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-0383, Japan. j-ishihara@azabu-u.ac.jp.
3
School of Life and Environmental Science, Department of Food and Life Science, Azabu University, 1-17-71 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa, 252-5201, Japan. j-ishihara@azabu-u.ac.jp.
4
Division of Epidemiology, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104-0045, Japan.
5
Department of Community Preventive Medicine, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 1-757 Asahimachidori, Chuo-ku, Niigata, 951-8510, Japan.
6
Department of Health Promotion Medicine, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 1-757 Asahimachidori, Chuo-ku, Niigata, 951-8510, Japan.
7
Department of Medical Statistics, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3, Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka, 545-8585, Japan.
8
Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Nara Women's University Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Kitauoyanishimachi, Nara, Nara, 630-8506, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Objective methods such as the monitoring of salt concentrations in home-prepared dishes may be effective in reducing salt intake. We investigated the effect of monitoring the salt concentration of home-prepared dishes (Monitoring) on salt reduction and change in taste threshold, and the effect of the simultaneous use of low-sodium seasonings (Seasoning) to compare the effect of Monitoring with the conventional method.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

We conducted a double-blind randomized controlled study using a 2 × 2 factorial design with two interventions. A total of 50 participants (40-75 years-old) were recruited among residents of Niigata Prefecture, a high sodium-consuming population in Japan, then randomly allocated to four groups. After excluding participants with incomplete urine collection, change in salt intake was evaluated using 24-hour urinary excretion as a surrogate of intake for 43 participants. Change in taste threshold was evaluated in 48 participants after excluding those with incomplete threshold measurement.

RESULTS:

The Monitoring intervention group showed a significant decrease in sodium intake (-777 mg/24 h), whereas the decrease in the Seasoning intervention group was not significant (-413 mg/24 h). Sodium intake did not statistically differ between the intervention and control groups (-1011 mg/24 h and -283 mg/24 h for Monitoring and Seasoning, respectively). The changes in taste threshold measurement were very small and did not markedly differ between groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Monitoring the salt concentration of dishes had a potentially stronger salt-reducing effect than the use of low-sodium seasonings, a conventional method. Confirmation requires additional study with a larger sample size.

PMID:
29321686
DOI:
10.1038/s41430-017-0053-2

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