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Physiother Theory Pract. 2018 Sep;34(9):682-691. doi: 10.1080/09593985.2018.1423590. Epub 2018 Jan 10.

The effects of pain neuroscience education and exercise on pain, muscle endurance, catastrophizing and anxiety in adolescents with chronic idiopathic neck pain: a school-based pilot, randomized and controlled study.

Author information

1
a School of Health Sciences , University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago , Aveiro , Portugal.
2
b Primary Healthcare Center , Ílhavo , Portugal.
3
c CINTESIS.UA , University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago , Aveiro , Portugal.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To compare the effectiveness of pain neuroscience education (PNE) and neck/shoulder exercises with no intervention in adolescents with chronic idiopathic neck pain (CINP).

METHODS:

Forty-three adolescents with CINP were randomly allocated to receive PNE and shoulder/neck exercises (n = 21) or no intervention (n = 22). Data on pain intensity, neck flexor and extensor muscles endurance, scapular stabilizers endurance, pain catastrophizing, anxiety, and knowledge of pain neurophysiology were collected. Measurements were taken before and after the intervention.

RESULTS:

All participants completed the study. Analysis using ANCOVA revealed a significant increase in the neck extensors endurance capacity (adjusted mean ± SE change = + 47.5 ± 13.5 s versus +14.2 ± 13.1 s) and knowledge of pain neurophysiology (adjusted mean ± SE change = + 9.8 ± 3.2 versus -0.6 ± 0.6) in the group receiving the intervention. A higher mean decrease in pain intensity, pain catastrophizing and anxiety and a higher mean increase in the scapular stabilizers endurance capacity were also found in the intervention group, but differences did not reach statistical significance.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results suggest a potential benefit of PNE and exercise for adolescents with CINP. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed.

KEYWORDS:

Education; adolescents; exercise; intervention; neck pain

PMID:
29319386
DOI:
10.1080/09593985.2018.1423590
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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