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Transl Psychiatry. 2018 Jan 10;8(1):15. doi: 10.1038/s41398-017-0063-9.

DNA methylome variation in a perinatal nurse-visitation program that reduces child maltreatment: a 27-year follow-up.

Author information

1
The Ludmer Centre for Neuroinformatics and Mental Health, Douglas Hospital Research Centre and Sackler Program for Epigenetics and Psychobiology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, H4H1R3, Canada. kieran.odonnell@mcgill.ca.
2
Canadian Institute For Advanced Research, Child and Brain Development Program, Toronto, M5G 1Z8, Canada. kieran.odonnell@mcgill.ca.
3
Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS), Agency for Science Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore, 119077, Singapore.
4
Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, Child and Family Research Institute, and Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4H4, Canada.
5
The Ludmer Centre for Neuroinformatics and Mental Health, Douglas Hospital Research Centre and Sackler Program for Epigenetics and Psychobiology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, H4H1R3, Canada.
6
National Center for Children and Families, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, 10027, USA.
7
College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, 10032, USA.
8
Laboratory of Neurogenetics, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Rockville, MD, 20852, USA.
9
Department of Psychology, University of Houston, Houston, TX, 77204, USA.
10
Departments of Molecular and Human Genetics and Pediatrics, Baylor School of Medicine, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.
11
Department of Psychology, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, 199034, Russia.
12
The Child Study Center and the Departments of Psychiatry, Pediatrics, and Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 06519, USA.
13
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA.
14
Canadian Institute For Advanced Research, Child and Brain Development Program, Toronto, M5G 1Z8, Canada.

Abstract

This study reveals the influence of child maltreatment on DNA methylation across the genome and provides the first evidence that a psychosocial intervention program, the Nurse Family Partnership (NFP), which targets mothers at risk for abusive parenting, associates with variation in the DNA methylome in adult offspring. The 188 participants were born to women randomly assigned to control (n = 99) or nurse-visited intervention groups (n = 89) and provided blood samples and a diagnostic interview at age 27 years. Interindividual variation in the blood DNA methylome was described using principal components (PC) scores derived from principal component analysis and showed that the NFP program (PC10: p = 0.029) and a history of abuse/neglect (PC1: p = 0.029, PC2: p = 0.009) significantly associated with DNA methylome variation at 27 years of age independent of gender, ancestry, cellular heterogeneity, and a polygenic risk index for major psychiatric disorders. The magnitude of the association between child maltreatment and DNA methylation was reduced when accounting for lifestyle factors, including smoking. These findings reflect the sustained impact of both childhood adversity as well as intervention programs that target such adversity on the epigenome but highlight the need for prospective longitudinal studies of DNA methylome variation in the context of early intervention programs.

PMID:
29317599
PMCID:
PMC5802588
DOI:
10.1038/s41398-017-0063-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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