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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 May;78(5):949-956.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2017.12.076. Epub 2018 Jan 6.

Postdiagnosis aspirin use and overall survival in patients with melanoma.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address: salehrachidi@gmail.com.
2
Department of Public Health Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.
3
Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, Indiana.
4
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mouse studies show that tumor-derived prostaglandins and platelets promote melanoma progression and immune evasion.

OBJECTIVE:

Determine whether aspirin confers longer survival in patients with melanoma.

METHODS:

A retrospective cohort study of 1522 patients at Indiana University Health who had melanoma diagnosed between 2000 and 2014 and were followed up through September 2016.

RESULTS:

Aspirin use was associated with longer overall survival in univariate analysis and after controlling for age, sex, stage, and treatment modalities (hazard ratio [HR], 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45-0.75). Aspirin use was not associated with survival in patients with in situ and stage I melanoma but was associated with better survival in stages II (HR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.24-0.82) and III (HR, 0.57; 95% CI; 0.34-0.96). No statistical significance was observed in stage IV patients (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.27-1.13). In turn, melanoma in patients using aspirin before diagnosis was less likely to be diagnosed in stages III or IV.

LIMITATIONS:

Observational study.

CONCLUSIONS:

Aspirin could provide a survival advantage in melanoma. Clinical trials investigating the therapeutic potential of aspirin are warranted.

KEYWORDS:

aspirin; melanoma; platelets; stage; survival; treatment

PMID:
29317280
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2017.12.076
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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