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Clin Radiol. 2018 May;73(5):505.e1-505.e8. doi: 10.1016/j.crad.2017.12.004. Epub 2018 Jan 6.

Imaging skeletal muscle volume, density, and FDG uptake before and after induction therapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

Author information

1
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Venue, New York, NY 10065, USA; Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA.
2
Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA.
3
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Venue, New York, NY 10065, USA.
4
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Venue, New York, NY 10065, USA. Electronic address: downeyr@mskcc.org.

Abstract

AIM:

To assess whether changes in body composition could be assessed serially using conventional thoracic computed tomography (CT) and positron-emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging in patients receiving induction chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

CT-based skeletal muscle volume and density were measured retrospectively from thoracic and lumbar segment CT images from 88 patients with newly diagnosed and untreated NSCLC before and after induction chemotherapy. Skeletal muscle 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) uptake was measured from PET/CT images from a subset of patients (n=42). Comparisons of each metric before and after induction chemotherapy were conducted using the non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test for paired data. The association between clinical factors and percentage change in muscle volume was examined using univariate linear regression models, with adjustment for baseline muscle volume.

RESULTS:

Following induction chemotherapy, thoracic (-3.3%, p=0.0005) and lumbar (-2.6%, p=0.0101) skeletal muscle volume were reduced (adiposity remained unchanged). The proportion of skeletal muscle with a density <0 HU increased (7.9%, p<0.0001), reflecting a decrease in skeletal muscle density and skeletal muscle FDG uptake increased (10.4-31%, p<0.05). No imaging biomarkers were correlated with overall survival.

CONCLUSION:

Changes in body composition can be measured from routine thoracic imaging. During chemotherapy skeletal muscle volume and metabolism are altered; however, there was no impact on survival in this retrospective series, and further validation in prospective, well-controlled studies are required.

PMID:
29317048
DOI:
10.1016/j.crad.2017.12.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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