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Nutrients. 2018 Jan 6;10(1). pii: E50. doi: 10.3390/nu10010050.

Vitamin and Mineral Supplement Use among Korean Adults: Baseline Data from the Trace Element Study of Korean Adults in Yeungnam Area.

Author information

1
Department of Food and Nutrition, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 38541, Korea. minkyeong@ynu.ac.kr.
2
Department of Food and Nutrition, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 38541, Korea. yj_lee@yu.ac.kr.
3
Department of Food and Nutrition, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 38541, Korea. kypark@ynu.ac.kr.

Abstract

Although dietary supplement use is believed to improve health status, the efficacy and safety of its use remains controversial. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of consumption of vitamin and mineral supplements (VMS) to the total micronutrient intake. Study participants (n = 586) were selected from the ongoing prospective cohort study of the Korean population, and baseline information on current use of dietary supplements, types of supplements, frequency of use, dosage, duration, and brand name was collected. Dietary information was assessed using a 146-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Approximately one-fourth of the participants were categorized as VMS users. The proportion of VMS use was significantly higher in women (p = 0.02), older participants (p = 0.002), and those with a higher income level (p = 0.03) than in non-users. All vitamin and mineral intakes of both groups met the recommended nutrient intake levels by food consumption alone, except for riboflavin, calcium, and magnesium. Approximately 0.7-3.4% of the VMS users had nutrient intake levels that exceeded the tolerable upper intake levels for vitamin A, E, C, iron, and iodine. Excessive use of VMS can lead to an increased risk for adverse health effects. The results of this study provide useful baseline data for establishing guidelines for the appropriate consumption and adequate intake levels of VMS.

KEYWORDS:

Koreans; dietary supplements; minerals; nutrient intake; recommended dietary intake; vitamins

PMID:
29316608
PMCID:
PMC5793278
DOI:
10.3390/nu10010050
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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