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J Viral Hepat. 2018 Jun;25(6):718-723. doi: 10.1111/jvh.12858. Epub 2018 Feb 19.

Occult HBV infection in HIV-infected adults and evaluation of pooled NAT for HBV.

Author information

1
Y.R. Gaitonde Centre for AIDS Research and Education, Chennai, India.
2
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
3
University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.

Abstract

The study aimed to determine the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus infection among HIV-infected persons and to evaluate the use of a pooling strategy to detect occult HBV infection in the setting of HIV infection. Five hundred and two HIV-positive individuals were tested for HBV, occult HBV and hepatitis C and D with serologic and nucleic acid testing (NAT). We also evaluated a pooled NAT strategy for screening occult HBV infection among the HIV-positive individuals. The prevalence of HBV infection among HIV-positive individuals was 32 (6.4%), and occult HBV prevalence was 10%. The pooling HBV NAT had a sensitivity of 66.7% and specificity of 100%, compared to HBV DNA NAT of individual samples. In conclusion, this study found a high prevalence of occult HBV infection among our HIV-infected population. We also demonstrated that pooled HBV NAT is highly specific, moderately sensitive and cost-effective. As conventional HBV viral load assays are expensive in resource-limited settings such as India, pooled HBV DNA NAT might be a good way for detecting occult HBV infection and will reduce HBV-associated complications.

KEYWORDS:

HIV ; HBV; occult HBV; pooled NAT and resource-limited settings

PMID:
29316078
PMCID:
PMC5980682
[Available on 2019-06-01]
DOI:
10.1111/jvh.12858
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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