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Allergy. 2018 May;73(5):1135-1140. doi: 10.1111/all.13379. Epub 2018 Feb 5.

Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D, nasopharyngeal airway metabolome, and bronchiolitis severity.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
2
Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research, Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
3
Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Allergy, and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

Low circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels are a risk factor for acute respiratory infection (eg, bronchiolitis) in children. However, little is known about the relation of circulating 25OHD with the many downstream functional molecules in target organs-such as the airway-and with clinical outcomes. In this prospective multicenter study of infants (age <1 year) hospitalized with bronchiolitis, we measured serum 25OHD levels and profiled the metabolome of 144 nasopharyngeal airway samples. Among 254 metabolites identified, we defined a set of 20 metabolites that are related to lower serum 25OHD and higher vitamin D-binding protein levels. Of these metabolites, 9 metabolites were associated with a significantly higher risk of positive pressure ventilation use. These metabolites were glycerophosphocholines esterified with proinflammatory fatty acids (palmitate, arachidonate, linoleate, and stearate), sphingomyelins, alpha-hydroxyisovalerate, 2-hydroxybutyrate, and 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)lactate (all FDR<0.05). Based on the multicenter data, vitamin D-related airway metabolites were associated with risks of bronchiolitis severity.

KEYWORDS:

airway; bronchiolitis; metabolome; severity; vitamin D

PMID:
29315663
PMCID:
PMC6167253
DOI:
10.1111/all.13379
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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