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Int J Psychol. 2018 Jan 4. doi: 10.1002/ijop.12472. [Epub ahead of print]

Personality traits and perceptions of organisational justice.

Author information

1
Department of Management and Organization, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
2
Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
3
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
4
Educational Sciences and Psychology, Philosophical Faculty, Joensuu University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
5
Unit of Psychology, Faculty of Education, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
6
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Fimlab Laboratories, University of Tampere School of Medicine, Tampere, Finland.
7
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
8
Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.

Abstract

This study examined the association between five-factor model personality traits and perceptions of organisational justice. The sample for the study comprised 903 participants (35-50 years old; 523 women) studied in 2007 and 2012. Measures used were the Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Five-Factor Inventory questionnaire and the short organisational justice measure. The results showed that high neuroticism was associated with low distributive, procedural and interactional justice. Furthermore, high agreeableness was associated with high procedural and interactional justice and high openness with high distributive justice. This study suggests that neuroticism, agreeableness and openness are involved in perceptions of organisational justice and that personality should be considered in research and in practices at the workplace.

KEYWORDS:

Equity theory; Five-factor model; Organisational justice; Personality

PMID:
29313976
DOI:
10.1002/ijop.12472

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