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Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Mar;25(9):8542-8549. doi: 10.1007/s11356-017-1141-5. Epub 2018 Jan 8.

Effects of glyphosate on early life stages: comparison between Cyprinus carpio and Danio rerio.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical and Environmental Sciences, University of Messina, Viale Ferdinando Stagno d'Alcontres, 31-98166 S. Agata-, Messina, Italy.
2
Department of Animal Protection, Welfare and Behaviour, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.
3
Department of Veterinary Public Health and Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Hygiene and Ecology, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, Brno, Czech Republic.
4
Department of Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical and Environmental Sciences, University of Messina, Viale Ferdinando Stagno d'Alcontres, 31-98166 S. Agata-, Messina, Italy. cfaggio@unime.it.

Abstract

Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) is an active substance of many herbicides. According to literature studies, glyphosate residues and their metabolites have been commonly detected in surface waters and toxicological reports confirmed negative effects on living organisms. In this study, the acute embryo toxicity of glyphosate into two different fish species-common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and zebrafish (Danio rerio)-was investigated. Lethal endpoints, development disorder, and, in addition, other sublethal endpoints such as hatching rate, formation of somites, and development of eyes, spontaneous movement, heartbeat/blood circulation, pigmentation, and edema were recorded to indicate the mode of action of the toxic compound. Hatching retardation (p < 0.05) was observed in experimental groups of common carp exposed to glyphosate with significant statistical difference especially at the highest concentration after 72, 96, and 120 hpf. The significantly highest cumulative mortality at concentration of 50 mg/l was observed. In contrast, hatching stimulation was observed in embryos of zebrafish exposed to the highest concentration of glyphosate. The significantly highest cumulative mortality for zebrafish was observed only at concentration of 50 mg/l. Based on our results, early life stages of common carp are more sensitive in comparison to zebrafish to the toxic action of glyphosate.

KEYWORDS:

Embryo toxicity tests; Fish; Glyphosate; Hatching; Herbicide; Malformation; Mortality

PMID:
29313199
DOI:
10.1007/s11356-017-1141-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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