Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMJ. 2018 Jan 8;360:j5145. doi: 10.1136/bmj.j5145.

The role of the gut microbiome in systemic inflammatory disease.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
2
Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, New York University School of Medicine and Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY 10003, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, New York University School of Medicine and Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY 10003, USA Jose.Scher@nyumc.org.

Abstract

The role of the gut microbiome in models of inflammatory and autoimmune disease is now well characterized. Renewed interest in the human microbiome and its metabolites, as well as notable advances in host mucosal immunology, has opened multiple avenues of research to potentially modulate inflammatory responses. The complexity and interdependence of these diet-microbe-metabolite-host interactions are rapidly being unraveled. Importantly, most of the progress in the field comes from new knowledge about the functional properties of these microorganisms in physiology and their effect in mucosal immunity and distal inflammation. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical evidence on how dietary, probiotic, prebiotic, and microbiome based therapeutics affect our understanding of wellness and disease, particularly in autoimmunity.

PMID:
29311119
PMCID:
PMC6889978
DOI:
10.1136/bmj.j5145
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center