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Exp Gerontol. 2018 Jul 1;107:169-177. doi: 10.1016/j.exger.2018.01.002. Epub 2018 Jan 4.

Fluid and imaging biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease: Where we stand and where to head to.

Author information

1
Medical Centre for the Elderly, University Hospital, University of Brasília (UnB), 70910-900 Brasília, DF, Brazil.
2
Translational Neuroimaging Laboratory, Research Centre for Studies in Aging, Douglas Hospital, McGill University, H4H 1R3 Montreal, QC, Canada.
3
Translational Neuroimaging Laboratory, Research Centre for Studies in Aging, Douglas Hospital, McGill University, H4H 1R3 Montreal, QC, Canada; Montreal Neurological Institute, H3A 2B4 Montreal, QC, Canada.
4
Medical Centre for the Elderly, University Hospital, University of Brasília (UnB), 70910-900 Brasília, DF, Brazil. Electronic address: otavionobrega@unb.br.

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that a number of potentially informative biomarkers for Alzheimer disease (AD) can improve the accuracy of diagnosing this form of dementia, especially when used as a panel of diagnostic assays and interpreted in the context of neuroimaging and clinical data. Moreover, by combining the power of CSF biomarkers with neuroimaging techniques to visualize Aβ deposits (or neurodegenerative lesions), it might be possible to better identify individuals at greatest risk for developing MCI and converting to AD. The objective of this article was to review recent progress in selected imaging and chemical biomarkers for prediction, early diagnosis and progression of AD. We present our view point of a scenario that places CSF and imaging markers on the verge of general utility based on accuracy levels that already match (or even surpass) current clinical precision.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer; Biomarker; Cerebrospinal fluid; Diagnosis; Mild cognitive impairment; Neuroimaging

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