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J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2018 May;31(5):598-605.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.echo.2017.11.021. Epub 2018 Jan 3.

Right Ventricular Structure and Function in the Veteran Ultramarathon Runner: Is There Evidence for Chronic Maladaptation?

Author information

1
Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
2
Cardiff Centre for Exercise and Health, Cardiff Metropolitan University Cyncoed Campus, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
3
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northern California Health Care System, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California; Department of Veterans Affairs, Northern California Health Care System, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California.
4
Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
5
Stanford University School of Medicine, Falk Cardiovascular Research Centre, Stanford, California.
6
Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Department of Physiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
7
Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom. Electronic address: d.l.oxborough@ljmu.ac.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It has been proposed that chronic exposure to prolonged strenuous exercise may result in maladaptation of the right ventricle (RV). The aim of this study was to establish RV structure and function, including septal insertion points, using conventional echocardiography and myocardial strain (ε) imaging in a veteran population of ultramarathon runners (UR) and age- and sex-matched controls.

METHODS:

A retrospective study design provided 40 UR (>35 years old; mean ± SD training experience, 18 ± 12 years) and 24 sedentary controls who had previously undergone conventional two-dimensional, tissue Doppler and speckle-tracking echocardiography to measure RV size and function. Peak RV ε and strain rate (SR) were assessed from the base, mid, and apical lateral wall. SR were assessed during systole (SRs'), early diastole (SRe') and late diastole (SRa'). Regional assessment of RV insertion points was made at the basal inferoseptum and apical septum using left ventricular (LV) longitudinal ε and at the anteroseptum and inferoseptum using LV circumferential and radial ε.

RESULTS:

All structural indices of RV size were significantly larger in UR. RV regional and global peak ε were not different between groups, whereas basal RV SR was significantly lower in UR. UR had significantly higher peak LV circumferential ε (anteroseptum, -26% ± 8% vs -21% ± 6%; inferoseptum, -25% ± 6% vs -16% ± 9%) and higher peak LV longitudinal ε (apical septum, -28% ± 7% vs -22% ± 4%) compared with controls. There was regional heterogeneity in UR that was not observed in controls with significantly lower longitudinal ε at the basal inferoseptal insertion point when compared with the global ε (-19% ± 2% vs -22% ± 4%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Myocardial ε imaging highlights no overt maladaptation in this cohort of veteran UR, although lower insertion point ε, compared with global ε, in UR may warrant further investigation.

KEYWORDS:

Echocardiography; Myocardial speckle-tracking; Right ventricle; Strain imaging; Ultramarathon runner

PMID:
29305036
DOI:
10.1016/j.echo.2017.11.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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