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J Neurosurg Spine. 2018 Mar;28(3):300-310. doi: 10.3171/2017.7.SPINE161434. Epub 2018 Jan 5.

Percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy compared with microendoscopic discectomy for lumbar disc herniation: 1-year results of an ongoing randomized controlled trial.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE A prospective randomized controlled study was conducted to clarify whether percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED) results in better clinical outcomes and less surgical trauma than microendoscopic discectomy (MED). METHODS In this single-center, open-label, randomized controlled trial, patients were included if they had persistent signs and symptoms of radiculopathy with corresponding imaging-confirmed lumbar disc herniation. Patients were randomly allocated to the PTED or the MED group by computer-generated randomization codes. The primary outcome was the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score 1 year after surgery. Secondary outcomes included scores of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey bodily pain and physical function scales, EuroQol Group's EQ-5D , and the visual analog scales for back pain and leg pain. Data including duration of operation, in-bed time, length of hospital stay, surgical cost and total hospital cost, complications, and reoperations were recorded. RESULTS A total of 153 participants were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups (PTED vs MED), and 89.5% (137 patients) completed 1 year of follow-up. Primary and secondary outcomes did not differ significantly between the treatment groups at each prespecified follow-up point (p > 0.05). For PTED, there was less postoperative improvement in ODI score in the median herniation subgroup at 1 week (p = 0.027), 3 months (p = 0.013), 6 months (p = 0.027), and 1 year (p = 0.028) compared with the paramedian subgroup. For MED, there was significantly less improvement in ODI score at 3 months (p = 0.008), 6 months (p = 0.028), and 1 year (p = 0.028) in the far-lateral herniation subgroup compared with the paramedian subgroup. The total complication rate over the course of 1 year was 13.75% in the PTED group and 16.44% in the MED group (p = 0.642). Five patients (6.25%) in the PTED group and 3 patients (4.11%) in the MED group suffered from residue/recurrence of herniation, for which reoperation was required. CONCLUSIONS Over the 1-year follow-up period, PTED did not show superior clinical outcomes and did not seem to be a safer procedure for patients with lumbar disc herniation compared with MED. PTED had inferior results for median disc herniation, whereas MED did not seem to be the best treatment option for far-lateral disc herniation. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT01997086 (clinicaltrials.gov).

KEYWORDS:

LDH = lumbar disc herniation; LSD = least-significant difference; MD = microdiscectomy; MED = microendoscopic discectomy; MISS = minimally invasive spine surgery; ODI = Oswestry Disability Index; PTED = percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy; SF36-BP = 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey bodily pain; SF36-PF = SF36 physical function; TESSYS = Transforaminal Endoscopic Spine System; VAS-back = visual analog scale for back pain; VAS-leg = VAS for leg pain; lumbar; lumbar disc herniation; microendoscopic discectomy; minimally invasive spine surgery; percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy; randomized controlled trial

PMID:
29303469
DOI:
10.3171/2017.7.SPINE161434
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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