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World J Microbiol Biotechnol. 2018 Jan 4;34(2):20. doi: 10.1007/s11274-017-2401-8.

Characterization of biosurfactants produced by the oil-degrading bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis S67 at low temperature.

Author information

1
Biotechnology Department, Tula State University, 92 Lenin Av., Tula, 300012, Russian Federation.
2
Biotechnology Department, Tula State University, 92 Lenin Av., Tula, 300012, Russian Federation. olgaponamoreva@mail.ru.
3
G.K. Skryabin Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, 5 Nauki Av., Pushchino, Moscow Region, 142290, Russian Federation.
4
Pushchino State Natural Science Institute, 3 Nauki Av., Pushchino, Moscow Region, 142290, Russian Federation.
5
Institute of Protein Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, 4 Nauki Av., Pushchino, Moscow Region, 142290, Russian Federation.
6
Swinburne University of Technology, PO Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC, 3122, Australia.

Abstract

Production of trehalolipid biosurfactants by Rhodococcus erythropolis S67 depending on the growth temperature was studied. R. erythropolis S67 produced glycolipid biosurfactants such as 2,3,4-succinoyl-octanoyl-decanoyl-2'-decanoyl trehalose and 2,3,4-succinoyl-dioctanoyl-2'-decanoyl trehalose during the growth in n-hexadecane medium at 26 and 10 °C, despite the different aggregate state of the hydrophobic substrate at low temperature. The surface tension of culture medium was found being reduced from 72 to 27 and 45 mN m-1, respectively. Production of trehalolipid biosurfactants by R. erythropolis S67 at low temperature could be useful for the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons at low temperatures by enhancing the bioremediation performance in cold regions.

KEYWORDS:

Biosurfactants; Low-temperature biodegradation; Oil-degrading bacterium; Rhodococcus; Trehalose lipid

PMID:
29302805
DOI:
10.1007/s11274-017-2401-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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