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Nutrients. 2018 Jan 3;10(1). pii: E35. doi: 10.3390/nu10010035.

Associations of Serum 25(OH)D Concentrations with Lung Function, Airway Inflammation and Common Cold in the General Population.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine and Endocrinology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam Movement Sciences, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ra.rafiq@vumc.nl.
2
Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2333 ZC Leiden, The Netherlands. willemienthijs@hotmail.com.
3
Department of Pulmonology, Haaglanden Medisch Centrum, 2501 CK Den Haag, The Netherlands. willemienthijs@hotmail.com.
4
Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2333 ZC Leiden, The Netherlands. raprein@gmail.com.
5
Department of Internal Medicine and Endocrinology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam Movement Sciences, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands. rt.dejongh@vumc.nl.
6
Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2333 ZC Leiden, The Netherlands. christian.taube@rlk.uk-essen.de.
7
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Ruhrlandklinik, West German Lung Center, University Hospital Essen, 457147 Essen, Germany. christian.taube@rlk.uk-essen.de.
8
Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2333 ZC Leiden, The Netherlands. p.s.hiemstra@lumc.nl.
9
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2333 ZC Leiden, The Netherlands. r.de_mutsert@lumc.nl.
10
Department of Internal Medicine and Endocrinology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam Movement Sciences, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands. m.denheijer@vumc.nl.
11
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2333 ZC Leiden, The Netherlands. m.denheijer@vumc.nl.

Abstract

Vitamin D is hypothesized to have a beneficial effect on lung function and respiratory infections. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations with lung function, airway inflammation and common colds. We performed a cross-sectional analysis in the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity (NEO) study, a population-based cohort study. We included participants with measurements of serum 25(OH)D, Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 s (FEV₁), Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO), and data on self-reported common colds (n = 6138). In crude associations, serum 25(OH)D was positively associated with FEV₁ and FVC, and negatively with FeNO and the occurrence of a common cold. After adjustment for confounders, however, these associations disappeared. Stratified analyses showed that Body Mass Index (BMI) was an effect modifier in the relationship between serum 25(OH)D and FEV₁, FVC and FeNO. In obese participants (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m²), 10 nmol/L higher 25(OH)D was associated with 0.46% predicted higher FEV₁ (95% Confidence Interval: 0.17 to 0.75), 0.46% predicted higher FVC (0.18 to 0.74), and 0.24 ppb lower FeNO (-0.43 to -0.04). Thus, in the total study population, 25(OH)D concentrations were not associated with lung function, airway inflammation and common colds. In obese participants, however, higher 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with a better lung function and lower airway inflammation.

KEYWORDS:

airway infection; airway inflammation; cold; lung function; obesity; pulmonary function; vitamin D

PMID:
29301349
PMCID:
PMC5793263
DOI:
10.3390/nu10010035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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