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PLoS One. 2018 Jan 4;13(1):e0190301. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0190301. eCollection 2018.

Oxytocin is lower in African American men with diabetes and associates with psycho-social and metabolic health factors.

Author information

1
Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States of America.
2
Department of Public Health Sciences, Loyola University, Maywood, IL, United States of America.
3
Section of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL, United States of America.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Recently, it has been suggested that oxytocin (OT) has a role in metabolism and neuropsychiatry health and disease, and therefore, it may represent a potential therapeutic target. The current study aimed to investigate relationships between OT and glycemic status along with psycho-social and behavioral factors.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

A total of 92 obese or overweight, African American, male subjects were enrolled in the study. Biometric and biochemical data were collected including oral glucose tolerance testing and urinary OT (measured by ELISA). Subjects also completed questionnaires on social and lifestyle factors.

RESULTS:

OT levels were found to be significantly lower in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) compared to normal glucose tolerance (p<0.05). When stratified by OT tertiles, subjects with higher OT had lower weight, body mass index (BMI) and hemoglobin A1c, but higher eGFR which remained significant after BMI adjustment. The highest OT tertile also had more smokers and more users of psychiatric medications. A stepwise ordered logistic regression supported these findings and could account for 21% of the variation in OT categories (pseudoR2 = 0.21).

CONCLUSIONS:

In this unique population, OT was found lower in subjects with diabetes but higher with better renal function, cigarette smoking and use of psychiatric medications. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings and examine the potential therapeutic role of OT.

PMID:
29300770
PMCID:
PMC5754076
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0190301
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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