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Neuroradiol J. 2018 Apr;31(2):157-167. doi: 10.1177/1971400917742470. Epub 2018 Jan 4.

Single-photon emission tomography imaging in patients with Lyme disease treated with human embryonic stem cells.

Author information

1
Nutech Mediworld, India.

Abstract

Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate the longitudinal changes in brain perfusion in patients with Lyme disease treated with human embryonic stem cells. Material and methods The study included 59 (age range 41.68 ± 16.37 years) patients with Lyme disease whose single-photon emission tomography imaging was performed before and after the human embryonic stem cell therapy. Technetium-hexa methyl propylene aminoxime single-photon emission tomography imaging was used to assess the hypoperfused lesions/regions in the brain prior to the therapy, as well as the improvement in perfusion after human embryonic stem cell treatment. Results After receiving human embryonic stem cell therapy, single-photon emission tomography imaging reflects a significant (>60%) improvement in 43 patients along with moderate (30-60%) and mild (<30%) improvement in 12 and four patients, respectively. The cerebral perfusion flow improved and the degree of hypoperfusion in the other regions significantly decreased after the human embryonic stem cell therapy. Interpretation of single-photon emission tomography imaging of brain images (before and after therapy) clearly presented the changes in color at various brain regions which represent the improvements in patients. Conclusion Single-photon emission tomography imaging could be used as a potential diagnostic tool to assess the response of Lyme disease patients to human embryonic stem cell therapy.

KEYWORDS:

Imaging; human embryonic stem cell therapy; magnetic resonance imaging; neurological disease; perfusion; single-photon emission tomography imaging

PMID:
29300119
PMCID:
PMC5882063
DOI:
10.1177/1971400917742470
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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