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Brain Behav. 2017 Nov 22;7(12):e00863. doi: 10.1002/brb3.863. eCollection 2017 Dec.

An interspecies comparative study of invasive electrophysiological functional connectivity.

Casimo K1,2, Levinson LH3, Zanos S2,4,5,6, Gkogkidis CA7,8, Ball T7,8, Fetz E1,2,4,5, Weaver KE1,9,10, Ojemann JG1,2,11,12.

Author information

1
Graduate Program in Neuroscience University of Washington Seattle WA USA.
2
Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering University of Washington Seattle WA USA.
3
Wesleyan University Middletown CT USA.
4
Department of Physiology and Biophysics University of Washington Seattle WA USA.
5
Washington National Primate Research Center University of Washington Seattle WA USA.
6
Feinstein Institute for Medical Research New York City NY USA.
7
Translational Neurotechnology Laboratory Department of Neurosurgery Faculty of Medicine Medical Center - University of Freiburg Freiburg Germany.
8
Laboratory for Biomedical Microtechnology Department of Microsystems Engineering Faculty of Engineering University of Freiburg Freiburg Germany.
9
Department of Radiology University of Washington Seattle WA USA.
10
Integrated Brain Imaging Center University of Washington Seattle WA USA.
11
Department of Neurological Surgery University of Washington Seattle WA USA.
12
Department of Neurological Surgery Seattle Children's Hospital Seattle WA USA.

Abstract

Introduction:

Resting-state connectivity patterns have been observed in humans and other mammal species, and can be recorded using a variety of different technologies. Functional connectivity has been previously compared between species using resting-state fMRI, but not in electrophysiological studies.

Methods:

We compared connectivity with implanted electrodes in humans (electrocorticography) to macaques and sheep (microelectrocorticography), which are capable of recording neural data at high frequencies with spatial precision. We specifically examined synchrony, implicated in functional integration between regions.

Results:

We found that connectivity strength was overwhelmingly similar in humans and monkeys for pairs of two different brain regions (prefrontal, motor, premotor, parietal), but differed more often within single brain regions. The two connectivity measures, correlation and phase locking value, were similar in most comparisons. Connectivity strength agreed more often between the species at higher frequencies. Where the species differed, monkey synchrony was stronger than human in all but one case. In contrast, human and sheep connectivity within somatosensory cortex diverged in almost all frequencies, with human connectivity stronger than sheep.

Discussion:

Our findings imply greater heterogeneity within regions in humans than in monkeys, but comparable functional interactions between regions in the two species. This suggests that monkeys may be effectively used to probe resting-state connectivity in humans, and that such findings can then be validated in humans. Although the discrepancy between humans and sheep is larger, we suggest that findings from sheep in highly invasive studies may be used to provide guidance for studies in other species.

KEYWORDS:

connectivity; electrocorticography; electrophysiology; functional connectivity; macaque; sheep; synchrony

PMID:
29299382
PMCID:
PMC5745242
DOI:
10.1002/brb3.863
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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