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Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw. 2018 Mar;21(3):179-186. doi: 10.1089/cyber.2017.0324. Epub 2018 Jan 2.

Computer/Mobile Device Screen Time of Children and Their Eye Care Behavior: The Roles of Risk Perception and Parenting.

Author information

1
1 Department of Health Promotion and Health Education, National Taiwan Normal University , Taipei, Taiwan .
2
2 Graduate Institute of Information and Computer Education, National Taiwan Normal University , Taipei, Taiwan .
3
3 Graduate Institute of Mass Communication, National Taiwan Normal University , Taipei, Taiwan .
4
4 Department of Nursing, Taipei Medical University , Taipei, Taiwan .
5
5 Department of Statistics, National Chengchi University , Taipei, Taiwan .
6
6 Department of Public Health, Kaohsiung Medical University , Kaohsiung, Taiwan .

Abstract

This study assessed the computer/mobile device screen time and eye care behavior of children and examined the roles of risk perception and parental practices. Data were obtained from a sample of 2,454 child-parent dyads recruited from 30 primary schools in Taipei city and New Taipei city, Taiwan, in 2016. Self-administered questionnaires were collected from students and parents. Fifth-grade students spend more time on new media (computer/smartphone/tablet: 16 hours a week) than on traditional media (television: 10 hours a week). The average daily screen time (3.5 hours) for these children exceeded the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations (≤2 hours). Multivariate analysis results showed that after controlling for demographic factors, the parents with higher levels of risk perception and parental efficacy were more likely to mediate their child's eye care behavior. Children who reported lower academic performance, who were from non-intact families, reported lower levels of risk perception of mobile device use, had parents who spent more time using computers and mobile devices, and had lower levels of parental mediation were more likely to spend more time using computers and mobile devices; whereas children who reported higher academic performance, higher levels of risk perception, and higher levels of parental mediation were more likely to engage in higher levels of eye care behavior. Risk perception by children and parental practices are associated with the amount of screen time that children regularly engage in and their level of eye care behavior.

KEYWORDS:

children; eye care behavior; mobile device; parenting; risk perception

PMID:
29293374
DOI:
10.1089/cyber.2017.0324
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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