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Dev Biol. 2018 Jan 15;433(2):374-383. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2017.08.024. Epub 2017 Dec 25.

The planarian TCF/LEF factor Smed-tcf1 is required for the regeneration of dorsal-lateral neuronal subtypes.

Author information

1
Hospital for Sick Children, Program in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G0A4; Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G0A4.
2
Hospital for Sick Children, Program in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G0A4; Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G0A4; Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G0A4. Electronic address: bret.pearson@sickkids.ca.

Abstract

The adult brain of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea (a freshwater flatworm) is a dynamic structure with constant cell turnover as well as the ability to completely regenerate de novo. Despite this, function and pattern is achieved in a reproducible manner from individual to individual in terms of the correct spatial and temporal production of specific neuronal subtypes. Although several signaling molecules have been found to be key to scaling and cell turnover, the mechanisms by which specific neural subtypes are specified remain largely unknown. Here we performed a 6 day RNAseq time course on planarians that were regenerating either 0, 1, or 2 heads in order to identify novel regulators of brain regeneration. Focusing on transcription factors, we identified a TCF/LEF factor, Smed-tcf1, which was required to correctly pattern the dorsal-lateral cell types of the regenerating brain. The most severely affected neurons in Smed-tcf1(RNAi) animals were the dorsal GABAergic neurons, which failed to regenerate, leading to an inability of the animals to phototaxis away from light. Together, Smed-tcf1 is a critical regulator, required to pattern the dorsal-lateral region of the regenerating planarian brain.

PMID:
29291981
DOI:
10.1016/j.ydbio.2017.08.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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